IMG 2885

Non-seasonal pruritus in an otherwise healthy mixed breed dog

Jackson is a 4 year old mixed breed dog who is presented to the dermatology service for concern over recurrent pruritus.

Meagan Rock, DVM, DACVD

MSPCA-Angell West, Waltham MA

History

Jackson is a 4 year old mixed breed dog who is presented to the dermatology service for concern over recurrent pruritus. The owner states that this started when Jackson was under a year of age, and has been ongoing and progressive since. There is no clear seasonal pattern to his pruritus; continuous symptoms. He has soft stool (fecal consistency score 4) and defecates 4-5 times/day. It is clear to the owner that he will have a flare of pruritus when given certain table scraps. The owner does not appreciate Jackson to have improvement with his pruritus when he is on Apoquel. At this time, his pruritus level is about a 4 on the 10cm visual analogue scale; Jackson sleeps comfortably through the night.

IMG 2885

 

Subjective

Friendly dog, BAR, BCS 4/9, pain 0/4, MM pink and moist, CRT < 2 seconds

Objective

The dermatologic examination was largely within normal limits. There was mild to moderate erythema of the concave pinnae and interdigital spaces (all paws). Nails and claw folds were normal. The perianal region as moderately erythematous with evidence of lichenification and hyperpigmentation.

Assessment

Non-seasonal pruritus – r/o cutaneous adverse food reaction vs. atopic dermatitis vs. combination

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References:

Verlinden , M. Hesta , S. Millet & G. P.J. Janssens (2006) Food Allergy in Dogs and Cats: A Review, Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 46:3, 259-273.

Olivry, T., Mueller, R.S. & Prélaud, P. Critically appraised topic on adverse food reactions of companion animals (1): duration of elimination diets. BMC Vet Res11, 225 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-015-0541-3

Olivry, T., Mueller, R.S. Critically appraised topic on adverse food reactions of companion animals (3): prevalence of cutaneous adverse food reactions in dogs and cats. BMC Vet Res 13, 51 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-017-0973-z

Mueller, R.S., Olivry, T. Critically appraised topic on adverse food reactions of companion animals (4): can we diagnose adverse food reactions in dogs and cats with in vivo or in vitro tests?. BMC Vet Res 13, 275 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-017-1142-0

Mueller, R.S., Olivry, T. Critically appraised topic on adverse food reactions of companion animals (6): prevalence of noncutaneous manifestations of adverse food reactions in dogs and cats. BMC Vet Res 14, 341 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-018-1656-0

Olivry, T., Mueller, R.S. Critically appraised topic on adverse food reactions of companion animals (7): signalment and cutaneous manifestations of dogs and cats with adverse food reactions. BMC Vet Res 15, 140 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-019-1880-2

Olivry, T., Mueller, R.S. Critically appraised topic on adverse food reactions of companion animals (9): time to flare of cutaneous signs after a dietary challenge in dogs and cats with food allergies. BMC Vet Res 16, 158 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-020-02379-3